Phone brands

Indians more likely to switch mobile brands when upgrading: report

India ranks second in the world when it comes to abandoning existing mobile phone brands for more attractive alternatives. According to data provided by YouGov, a UK-based international internet-based market research and data analysis company, 28% of Indians surveyed said they would be willing to switch mobile phone brand the next time they mobile phone purchase.

According to the report, Indians’ propensity to switch brands was second only to Indonesia, where 30% of participants surveyed gave this answer.

The report shows that when it comes to mobile phone renewal considerations, a third of urban Indians (33%) plan to upgrade their mobile phone with the same brand. The decision to stick with their current phone brand or switch to a new one is evenly split, with almost three in ten (28%) planning to consider each option.

Contrasting data

These data contrast with the more developed markets, European, North American or Australian, where the propensity to change brand of mobile phone is very low, between 8 and 11%.

“Brand sticker trends are highest among European markets such as Germany, Poland, Spain and Great Britain (51-47%). On average, two in five consumers in Mexico, Canada and the United States are also likely to share the same sentiments (44-37%). When it comes to upgrading phones from the same brand, Danes (43%) are most likely to do so, followed by Singaporeans and UAE consumers (39% each).

Low brand loyalty

Explaining the contrasting trends between India and Western markets, Navkendar Singh, Associate Vice President, Customer Services and IDPS, IDC India noted: wider range of phone brands compared to Western markets. The Indian market is dominated by mid to lower range mobile phone categories where the differences between brands are very limited unlike high end phones. So there is a limited loyalty.

In global markets, telcos are partnering with smartphone makers to offer specific brands to consumers. In the case of India, these partnerships between companies and phone manufacturers are more limited and do not necessarily limit competition between smartphone brands.